Oh…….wow.

This is the post that a friend told me I would write eventually.  The one about having a child with typical development following a child with special needs.  The one that has me simultaneously in awe, and slightly heartbroken.

In a nutshell, a hard post.

This kid.

This kid.

This morning I decided to organize Melody’s clothes. She has a few bins of hand-me-downs from friends that are willy nilly all over her room and it was high time that I went through them.  On the dresser was a Baby Einstein book with buttons on the outside. When pushed, they play short snippets of classical music.  Evan had a few of these books. I remember his adoration of them. I remember being in a store and giving him one of them and he would play with it for the entire store visit. This was Evan’s norm.  He could be given a toy- especially a musical or push button one that had some type of cause and effect mechanism and he was good to go. I could go to the basement to do laundry while he sat on the floor of his pack and play at 18 months playing with a musical box, pressing each side over and over, laughing, singing, etc.

So today, when I ripped off the plastic on this book for Melody, I thought, “Hmm, this will be perfect. I will give her this book, she will be so excited to play with this new electronic toy- that I will be able to organize and she will be happily occupied. (and without T.V! score for Mommy!)

I gave it to her, and she smiled through her pacifier stuffed mouth and tapped the book on the cover while looking at it quizzically.

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I turned to my pile of clothes and started sorting.  A few minutes later I noticed M walking around her crib.  Thought nothing of it.  Still sorting.  Then a few min after that she was in her closet trying to open boxes.  Few min after that, she was crawling in my lap, trying to get me to put a headband on her head through several gestures and vocalizations.

Oh…..wow…..

That musical book is not magical.

Melody is not caught in its spell like Evan was. (and might still be if given the opportunity. do NOT mention Fisher Price to that kid)

She is more interested in playing.

interacting. keeping joint attention.

throwing fits when she doesn’t get her way.

doing what 14 month olds do.

Not what my child with Williams Syndrome and autism did at that age.

I have these moments a few times a week.  Actually probably a few times a day but I don’t dwell on every one.  Melody is not a baby genius. She is not advanced. She is just developing at a typical rate.  What is true is that things come much easier to M than they did for Evan.

On one of our trips to see Dr. Mervis, I remember her saying that Evan really needed to practice dropping objects into containers. I think he was about 18 months at the time.  He would hold things over a box or a bucket but not let go.  This was HUGE in the eyes of the early intervention evaluators.  I had never thought about it before they pointed it out to me.  I can remember like it was yesterday, the night after we saw Dr. Mervis- Evan dropped his elephant toy into one of the hotel room drawers and we all celebrated. It was a massive milestone and we lamented that he waited until AFTER the research study to do it.

I can’t remember the first time Melody dropped an object into a container. It’s as though she has always done it.  I can even ask her to retrieve a toy and she will crawl behind furniture to get it and bring to me.

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Climbs. Every. Thing

This difference in development is both fascinating and tough.  I constantly am asking Todd, “Did you see her do____________??” Did you hear her say ___________? Did you see her point to her body parts?

That is the fun, exciting part. The hard part is the little tiny punch in the gut I get each time I realize what Evan wasn’t doing at Melody’s age. I feel a weird guilt that I didn’t know any better but also……………. relief that I didn’t know any better.

I have heard that the really hard part is when your younger child starts to move ahead of your older child developmentally.

Well, we’ll cross that bridge when we come to it. For now, we are just enjoying our kids and doing our best to celebrate all their achievements and not get caught up in every “Wow, I get it…..” moment that occurs.

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Hey Mom, you can be proud of both of us!

 

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