Look at me, Mama

Evan and our family has been a part of a research study out of the University of Louisville since he was 18 months old.  I’ve talked about it here, here, and here.

A part of that study is a monthly phone conversation that I had with Dr. Carolyn Mervis, the principal investigator in the study.  I had multiple forms to fill out monthly, to update Dr. Mervis on Evan’s speech and language process.  Some months I looked forward to the call, because I was excited to share the new words Evan was using.  Some months I waited until the very last minute to do the forms because I knew he hadn’t made much progress that month, or maybe our lives were crazy that month and I hadn’t noticed any big changes. (ie: Melody’s birth, one of my miscarriages, etc)

Some items would stay unmarked for months, sometimes years, “Does your child use his/her index finger to show INTEREST in something, not just to ask for something?”

Nope. Still doesn’t really do that.

But there was one item that puzzled me month after month.

The item said, ” When your child is playing with a toy, does he/she look at you and then back at the toy?”

Huh?

I remember admitting to Dr. Mervis one month, that I didn’t quite know what that looked like.  I’ll never forget what she said. “You’ll know it when you see it,”

Ok sure, I’ll just figure it out on my own.

Well, until a few months ago, I don’t think I really knew, but I do now.

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Look at me, Mama!

I know now because Melody does it, all day, every day.  She crawls around playing with toys, standing up, cruising, playing again, all the while, she looks to see if I am paying attention.

So that is what she meant.

Evan looks at me. We cuddle together, we sing, we play rough house games and we check in all during those times.  But “social referencing,” or checking in with your play partner, loved one, etc while interacting…it just doesn’t come as naturally to him.  He does it more now, especially when in a situation where he is not familiar. He might look to me, because he needs comfort or security.

Melody does it because she is a typically developing 9 month old who wants to make sure I am paying attention. Just because.

Sometimes this feels amazing, exhilarating almost.  To know that she is “on track,” that she wants to make sure I am there.  Something we still “work on” with Evan. We have to be intentional about encouraging referencing and the motivation behind it.  To know that it won’t be so hard with Melody. (not that she won’t have her own set of hard)

Sometimes I feel a pit in my stomach. I feel guilty that I am excited. I realize how incredibly hard Evan works for all his milestones.

Melody is standing on her own, and almost walking at nine months.

No hands!

No hands!

Evan walked at 25 months.  I can remember it like it was yesterday. It was so exciting.

I know….they are different people. And not just because of their chromosomal makeup.  They are different genders, different personality types, etc.  I shouldn’t compare.

But having a child with special needs born first, it is hard not to.

I remember being pregnant with Melody and talking with other friends who had their child with Williams Syndrome first, and than a second child without special needs.  They said it would be so different.  Not bad, not good, not better. Just different.

I couldn’t agree more.

But I will say this, having the two of them together, is way better.

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Bro and sis, checking out the geese

Sigh....My heart.

Sigh….My heart.

 

 

2 Comments on Look at me, Mama

  1. Sarah
    July 12, 2016 at 2:22 pm (1 year ago)

    You have such beautifully expressed insights. Thanks for sharing them.

    Reply
    • Erin
      July 13, 2016 at 10:21 am (1 year ago)

      Thank you so very much, Sarah. I appreciate your kind words.

      Reply

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